Could Sheryl Sandberg Dress Like Mark Zuckerberg and Succeed?

Recently, a London receptionist made headlines when she challenged her temp company, which demanded that she wear two- to four-inch heels as part of a "formal dress code." If you're reading this in the U.S., and think something like that could never happen to you, think again: generally speaking, in most states it's legal for employers to impose one dress code on women and another on men, as long as it doesn't require more formal attire from one gender.

Dress codes are one thing, but even those of us who are lucky enough to work in places where the policy is something along the lines of, "Please don't come to work naked," can't escape the added pressure professional women face to look "groomed" – in other words, to wear makeup, to blow-dry their hair, and in many cases, yes, to wear high heels. In a recent column in The Huffington Post, Emily Peck invites us to consider, for example, the difference between the day-to-day attire of Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Why Mark Zuckerberg’s 2-Month Paternity Leave Is Good News for Working Parents

Recently, Mark Zuckerberg announced that he will take two months off after his wife Priscilla Chan gives birth. That shouldn't come as a shock: after all, Facebook, like many tech companies, offers a generous paid parental leave policy for both moms and dads. But in a country where paid paternity leave is rare – only 13 percent of dads who took leave after their children arrived received pay, compared to 21 percent of moms, according to the Department of Labor – and chief executives are expected to show leadership by making their companies the unequivocal center of their lives, Zuckerberg's choice to take some time off is almost radical. If it becomes a trend, especially among male CEOs, it could even have positive repercussions for the rest of us in our working lives.