How to Be a Real Mentor

If you've been approached to mentor someone, you've been given an amazing opportunity to guide your mentee's career, to impart your wisdom, to help them in their aspirations. In addition to being recognized for your achievements, and being valued for your experience, the opportunity to mentor someone relatively new in their career can be a mutually enriching association.

4 Reasons You Don’t Need a Formal Mentor

When you're new to a field, or even just working in a new position, there's a lot to learn. It's useful to have someone to help you understand the ins and outs of the work. And, it's important to be able to get your questions answered when they pop up. A lot of people feel that there are tremendous benefits to participating in a formal mentor/mentee relationship in order to address these needs. However, there might be another way – or even a better way – to meet the same goals. Here are some reasons you might NOT need a mentor.

Facebook and LinkedIn Team Up to Help Women in Tech

The two social network powerhouses, Facebook and LinkedIn, are joining forces to launch programs that will encourage more women to pursue degrees and careers in what has long been a man's world -- the world of tech. Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg (COO) and LinkedIn's Jeffrey Weiner (CEO) are launching mentoring and support programs at colleges to inspire more women to pursue tech-related education in hopes that they will, one day, fill the thousands of job availabilities in the heavily male-dominant tech industry.

What’s in a Name? Discrimination, If You’re a College Student

Finding a college professor to mentor you may not be easy, unless you’re a white male or at least appear to be one by name alone. In a recent study of more than 6,500 professors at the top 250 schools, researchers found that professors were more likely to deny opportunities to women and minorities -- a bias that appears after only knowing a student's name. This is especially evident in faculty linked to more lucrative professions.