More Tech Companies Cast a Net for Diversity Leaders

A new wave of tech companies has started to publicly prioritize diversity by giving it its own job title. Many of tech's big guns, including Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, Apple, and Google already consider diversity efforts worthy of an in-house point person, according to HR Dive.

Are Tech Jobs Just Crazy Hard on Workers?

The short answer is "yes." It's also "no" and "it depends." The recent New York Times critique of Amazon's work culture — the most commented-on piece in the publication's history — has resulted in a firestorm of both backlash and support from the media and tech titans. Former and current Amazon employees have chimed in, sharing views and experiences that both support and negate the Times' claim that Amazon is a company guilty of "conducting an experiment in how far it can push white-collar workers to get them to achieve its ever-expanding ambitions."

Microsoft EVP Stephen Elop’s Layoff Memo: By the Way, You Might Not Have a Job Next Year

Yesterday, the hinted-at changes in Microsoft's workforce took shape and heft, to the tune of 18,000 job cuts over the next year. The figure represents about 14 percent of Microsoft's workforce. The majority of those cuts, 12,500 jobs, will come in Microsoft's devices and services unit, which absorbed Nokia last year. How did workers in the mobile unit discover this? In the eleventh paragraph of a memo from former Nokia CEO and current Microsoft executive vice president Stephen Elop.

Bill Gates Was Some Lucky Person’s Secret Santa on Reddit

Social media is one of the greatest ways to connect with loved ones and complete strangers around the world – so, why not use it for a nationwide Secret Santa gift exchange? That’s what many companies, big and small, have been doing across the nation to spread some good ol’ holiday spirit. You never know who you might get.

College Grads Want to Work at Microsoft, Not Facebook

Contrary to popular belief, it looks like Facebook hasn’t yet taken over every aspect of young people’s lives -- especially their career paths. According to global employer research and advisory company, Universum USA, good old Microsoft wins over the younger, popular social network when it comes to where recent graduates want to work.