#MondayMotivation: 3 Sports Psychology Tricks to Beat the Grind

If you're reading this from your desk, you're probably not a professional athlete. But, that doesn't mean that you have nothing in common with your favorite sports heroes. For example, you both have to deal with what performance psychologist James Taylor calls "the Grind," the point at which training (or working) becomes "tiring, painful, and tedious."

"The Grind is what separates successful athletes from those who don't achieve their goals," writes Taylor in Psychology Today. "Many athletes when they reach this point either ease up or give up because it's just too darned hard. But truly motivated athletes reach the Grind and keep on going."

#MondayMotivation: 5 Easy Ways to Get Excited About Your Career Again, Starting Today

In times of career crisis – when you're unemployed, or facing major upheaval on the org chart – you probably long to be bored. Then things settle down, and you get into a routine, and boredom doesn't seem that great after all. The problem, of course, is that once you're feeling meh about your job or your career, it's hard to motivate to do anything about it. Taking a class or setting up networking coffees seems like an awful lot of work. It'd be easier to just put in your time at the old desk and then go home and start methodically working your way through your Netflix queue.

#MondayMotivation: 5 Ways to Work in Sprints and Rescue Your Productivity

If you pride yourself on being able to keep a lot of plates spinning at the same time, I'm about to blow your mind: you probably aren't a good multitasker. That's nothing against you. The fact is, most people can only do one thing at a time. The folks who seem to be managing it are really just switching tasks quickly. But, even those super-productive people would be better off focusing. In fact, research shows that task switching could cost up to 40 percent of a worker's productive time.

#MondayMotivation: 10 Pieces of Wisdom on Optimism From Baseball Players

Yesterday marked Opening Day, the first day of the MLB season, and the last day every baseball fan starts off their morning filled with hope. Traditionally, by the end of the day, some of the more Eeyore-like fans have transitioned from, "Maybe this is our year," to, "This year will be an epic disaster." You're more likely to be one of those if your team lost one of the three games played yesterday, but it's not impossible to develop a glass-half-empty approach even if they didn't play at all. Trust me on this: I'm from Boston.

As much fun as it is to be a cynic, too much pessimism isn't really good for you. Concentrating on the negative can impact your health, happiness, and even your career. Fortunately, baseball offers a cure, as well as means to develop the disease.