Are Tech Jobs Just Crazy Hard on Workers?

The short answer is "yes." It's also "no" and "it depends." The recent New York Times critique of Amazon's work culture — the most commented-on piece in the publication's history — has resulted in a firestorm of both backlash and support from the media and tech titans. Former and current Amazon employees have chimed in, sharing views and experiences that both support and negate the Times' claim that Amazon is a company guilty of "conducting an experiment in how far it can push white-collar workers to get them to achieve its ever-expanding ambitions."

Tech Workers Are So, So Young

With kids toddling around around with iPads and an entire generation raised on social media, it's commonly accepted that technology is mastered by the young. So it should come as no surprise to find out that the median age in the tech industry is young. Very young. And also, very male.

Are Husbands Going Out of Style?

Way back when, marriage was a necessity for women. They needed a husband to sign for a loan, job security (yes employers looked at marriage status) and, in general, to achieve upward mobility. Now that the union more of an emotional and social connection than an economic partnership, more women eschew holy matrimony in favor of independence. These days, there's just not as much demand for husbands.

What if All the Good Jobs Disappear?

You spend years acquiring a specialized skill. You go to school, land the coveted internship and then, your professional coming-of-age. You get the gig. After some time in the field, there's some technological breakthrough. It's exciting, historic and ... it puts you out of a job. Sound familiar?

Is Diversity Declining in Top Professions?

A half-century after the advent of affirmative action, diversity in the nation's top professions appears to be stagnating. An analysis by the New York Times includes startling figures showing that the percentage of black doctors and architects, to name a couple fields, has remained the same for two decades.

Women are Increasingly Both Breadwinners and Caregivers

As more women join the workforce and climb the corporate ladder they're more likely to fill the role of family breadwinner. Yet those professional advancements come without without the luxury to relinquish any of their traditionally held caregiver responsibilities, like shuttling kids to and from school, taking care of doctor appointments and housework, according to a Pew Research Center study released Wednesday.