Twitter Offers 20 Weeks of Paid Parental Leave for Moms and Dads

Families were never as "traditional" as politicians or 20th century stereotypes would have us believe. Throughout human history, primary caregivers have come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and ages. Until recently, however, it was pretty hard for even high-earning executives at elite U.S. companies to get paid time off for a new baby – especially if they weren't female and/or hadn't given birth to the child. But all that is changing. Today, Twitter joins the ranks of tech companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Microsoft, in offering fully paid parental leave for any parent who wants time off to care for a new baby.

What’s So Wrong With European Work Culture, Anyway?

There's an unfortunate stereotype about Europe that often rears its head when politicians are talking about the U.S. economy and work culture. Comparisons with countries like France and Italy can characterize these European states as lazy, unmotivated, and dangerous for free market growth.

Why Mark Zuckerberg’s 2-Month Paternity Leave Is Good News for Working Parents

Recently, Mark Zuckerberg announced that he will take two months off after his wife Priscilla Chan gives birth. That shouldn't come as a shock: after all, Facebook, like many tech companies, offers a generous paid parental leave policy for both moms and dads. But in a country where paid paternity leave is rare – only 13 percent of dads who took leave after their children arrived received pay, compared to 21 percent of moms, according to the Department of Labor – and chief executives are expected to show leadership by making their companies the unequivocal center of their lives, Zuckerberg's choice to take some time off is almost radical. If it becomes a trend, especially among male CEOs, it could even have positive repercussions for the rest of us in our working lives.

Here’s Why Amazon’s New Parental Leave Policy Matters

If you've missed out on the back and forth between Amazon and The New York Times, the short version is that it has hardly been a mutual admiration society. At the end of the summer, the newspaper published a scathing report detailing how the company is "redrawing the boundaries of what is acceptable" in how far it can push its employees. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos was quick to respond with an internal memo, saying that he did not believe the company in the article was the Amazon he knows, encouraging employees to report any instances of the behavior it described. Now it seems Amazon is taking concrete steps to correct that perception more broadly.