Yes, the Gender Pay Gap Is Real, and No, It’s Not Women’s Fault

Women don't ask, so they don't get. Or: women should wait their turn, and let karma sort it out. Or: women choose low-paying jobs, and/or work fewer hours, so they shouldn't expect to be paid as much as a man. There's just one problem with all of these explanations for why the gender pay gap isn't real, or at least, isn't really an issue that needs solving: they're all nonsense.

6 Ways Women (and Men) Can Celebrate Equal Pay Day 2016

Equal Pay Day has been on our calendars since its conception by the National Committee on Pay Equity in 1996, but very little has actually been done to close the wage gap between men and women in America. Recent research shows that in 2016, women only earn 74 cents for every dollar a man makes. Even if we look at men and women in the same jobs, women earn less: comparing only like job titles, experience, and education, women make 97 percent of what men earn. If this information rustles your jimmies like it does mine, I've got six things you can do right now to help close the gender pay gap this Equal Pay Day.

#EqualPayDay: 10 Quotes to Inspire You to Fight for Pay Equity

Equal Pay Day is the date when women's pay symbolically "catches up" with men's earnings from the previous year. This year, April 12 is the big day: the average woman has now made as much money, from Jan 1, 2015 until today, as the average man did by New Year's Eve 2015.

There are a lot of reasons why women earn less than men. PayScale's report, Inside the Gender Pay Gap, show that even in similar roles, controlling for education, experience, and hours worked, women make less money than men. Unconscious bias is a factor, as is "job choice"; women are more likely than men to work at low-paying jobs, and less likely than men to be in leadership roles.