Report: Technology Is Creating Jobs, Not Eliminating Them

A recent Deloitte study based on 140 years of England and Wales census data found that technology has produced more new jobs than made existing ones obsolete. This is particularly true of "caring" occupations that require cognitive thinking, such as nurses and teachers, as opposed to "muscle power" occupations, such as weavers and metal-makers, which are more easily replaced by machinery. In other words, as long as we have brains and do our best to maximize their potential, we may not need to be terrified that we will be replaced by robots. While it's important to keep in mind that the Deloitte economists' assessment is limited to the U.K. workforce and thus not necessarily indicative of larger global trends, the study's findings do paint an overall rosier picture of technology's impact on human-occupied occupations in comparison to other recent studies.

Job Training Funds Go to Workers Who Need It Least

A recent Georgetown University report on employee training trends and spending claims that the least experienced American workers are often the ones who ironically receive the least postsecondary job training from employers and educational institutions. "Employer training trends to be for the most experienced and most educated employees," summarizes lead author Anthony Carnevale of the study's revelations.

Meet the YouTube Millionaires

Turns out, you didn't need that Harvard education after all! According to Social Blade*, a site that tracks YouTube statistics, a laptop and regular trips to FAO Schwarz may be a wiser career investment than an Ivy League education -- and the potential mountains of student loan debt that come with it. Why? Because, according to recent data from that site, it is now possible to earn a multi-million-dollar annual salary by unwrapping toys on the internet. (Whether it's likely that you'll hit the big time, of course, is another story.)

13 Incredible Company Perks

From fledgling tech start-ups to household-name corporations, employers both big and small are continuously upping the ante when it comes to finding ways to keep their workers happy. While unusually cool perks like Etsy's playground-esque open lofts, or simply invaluable incentives such as the unlimited vacation days offered at Gravity Payments (that's right -- unlimited) might not be the deciding factor in someone's decision to accept a job, they can certainly be a factor. Smart employers know this, and make a point to incorporate additional takeaways into a job offer (besides the opportunity of employment itself). From onsite "Kegerators" to employer-subsidized egg freezing for female employees (seriously), here's a rundown of some of the most interesting perks* currently satisfying employees and enticing potential hires.

The Women on Top: The Country’s Highest-Paid Female CEOs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 248,760 Americans held the job title "Chief Executive" in 2013. As leaders who are (at least theoretically) responsible for making some of the most crucial decisions involving a company and its workforce, Chief Executives have at times singular amounts of authority, privilege, and responsibility. They are compensated accordingly, usually with salaries clocking in at a minimum of six figures. In the U.S., for example, CEOs earn an annual median salary of $153,353, according to PayScale's Salary Survey, which includes 6,674 CEOs.

Use PayScale’s Best Jobs for You Tool to Find Your Dream Job

Choosing a job is never an easy task, whether you’re a fresh-faced student deciding on a field of study or an experienced professional thinking about your next big career move. PayScale’s new Best Jobs for You tool is here to make that decision a lot easier. This new tool allows you to comb through our immense career database to find a job that matches your preferences, experience and education levels and earns the salary you want.

Tech Workers Are So, So Young

With kids toddling around around with iPads and an entire generation raised on social media, it's commonly accepted that technology is mastered by the young. So it should come as no surprise to find out that the median age in the tech industry is young. Very young. And also, very male.

Women More Engaged Than Men at Work

A recent poll found that more workers have "checked out" of their jobs mentally, but that women tend to be more engaged at work than men. Part of that might have to do with the fact that women are more likely to take advantage of flex time, which contributes to a person's sense of independence and satisfaction.

Can Technology and Accountability Save Higher Education?

Higher education in America faces a dilemma. How can we make college more accessible, make sure students learn, make sure they finish their degrees on time and still keep it affordable enough for all socioeconomic levels? At least one study suggests technology and improved accountability measures could be the answer.