#MondayMotivation: Learn How to Procrastinate From 3 Famous Writers

If you're a committed procrastinator, you're probably also pretty good at making excuses. Missed trains, minor domestic crises, even the tried-and-true "the dog ate my homework" routine – they're all pretty good for a delay, provided you don't use them too often. After a while, people will wonder why the train works for them, but not for you ... and how much it would cost to send your dog to obedience school on your behalf. Eventually, you're going to need some new stories to tell the boss.

PayScale’s VIP Blog Roundup: What to Ask Instead of ‘What Do You Do?’

What's the worst part about networking? All the horrifyingly dull questions you have to ask and answer, in order to establish new relationships with your fellow humans. But, there's no law that says we have to stick to the same old, same old. Mixing things up might actually get some better answers, build stronger connections, and bore everyone a lot less. In this week's roundup, we look at 27 questions to ask instead of "What do you do?," plus the housekeeping questions you must ask at your next job interview, and the best ways to get motivated when you're feeling uninspired.

How to Get Stuff Done at Work During the Holiday Season

It's getting closer and closer to the holidays, and you might feel like you're being pulled in a million different directions. Do you have presents to shop for? A house to decorate? Food to cook (and eat)? Friends and family to visit with? Oh yeah, and a job to do? Here are some tips for how to get it all done while still having a bit of holiday fun.

This Is Why Procrastination Works for You

Some people don't procrastinate. It's shocking, but true. These calm, level-headed folks function on a rotating pattern of accomplishment and relaxation. A balance is achieved, stress is kept at bay, and stuff gets done. However, everyone is different. Not everyone can achieve, function, and thrive, when things flow in such an orderly and relaxed way. Some of us need chaos to do our best work. So, we procrastinate.

How to Work When You Just Don’t Feel Like It

The tendency to procrastinate is one of those mysteries of human nature: why put things off, when we know perfectly well that we'll have to do them eventually? Often, it's because we "just don't feel like it." But learning to do things when you don't feel like it is an essential part of being a successful, productive person -- and it's easier than you think.