Avoid These 4 Common Career Regrets

We’d all love to live a life free from regrets. Ideally, we’d focus on the fact that we wouldn’t be who we are today if we’d made different choices in the past. Some days, that’s easier than others.

What’s always …

5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Leaving Your Company

Although it's something of a myth that Americans change jobs more than they used to, we do tend to move around quite a bit. In 2012, the average job tenure was just 4.6 years (keep in mind though that it was 3.7 years in 2002 and just 3.5 years in 1983). But, even though taking a new position and leaving an old one behind is a pretty common thing to do, it's not an action you should take too lightly, particularly if you're not just changing positions but actually leaving your organization. So, before you make your final decision and officially announce that you're moving on, ask yourself these questions.

Why Young Women Quit: Busting the Myths

Leaders often assume that the main reason women in their 20s and 30s quit their jobs is because they are having children and opting to "lean out." In fact, a recent global study shows, women leave for the same reason men do: they want more money. The truth is that young women simply aren't being paid as much or promoted to top jobs at the same rate as their male colleagues. So why do so many employers assume that women quit because of family, instead of finances?

How Highly Do You Value a Good Paycheck vs. Mental Well-Being?

This week on Reddit, Phoenixfighter09 talks to the /f/personalfinance community about his current job situation. Unhappy, stressed out, and exhausted from toxic co-workers, he's debating quitting his job of six months and taking a massive pay cut in hopes of pursuing his real passion while also salvaging his mental health and personal relationships. Should he stick it out or should he quit? Let's unpack the details in this all-too-common scenario.

Millennials: Thinking About Quitting Your Job? You’re Not Alone.

When you hear about a lot of people all leaving the same company, you may tend to think that there's something wrong with the organization. But what does it mean when people from the same generation are all planning to leave their jobs? Well, that's what is happening with Millennials. In fact, a recent survey revealed that two out of three Millennial workers plan to quit their current jobs by 2020 — which is now less than four years away. There may be some signs it's time for you to consider leaving, too.

The Unofficial Quit-Your-Job Checklist: 5 Steps to Take

You don't need me to tell you what you already know: it's time to quit. You're reading all sorts of blog posts about it, fantasizing about that grand exit speech, and constantly picturing yourself in other jobs. It's OK. You're not alone: 70 percent of Americans are not engaged at work. The trouble is that you're not sure you can quit right now, right? Not so fast.

Why People Quit Their Dream Jobs

With an insanely competitive interview process that can take four to six weeks, include up to eight rounds of interviews, and require responses to seemingly irrelevant questions such as, "How many trees are there in Washington state?," jobs at Amazon and other top tech employers are hard to get. The thought of someone who actually managed to snag a coveted spot with a dream company voluntarily choosing to relinquish said position might sound unfathomable. And yet many people do exactly that.

Thinking About Quitting Your Job? Ask Yourself These 5 Questions First

The economy is getting better, but good jobs still aren't exactly growing on trees. Even in a red-hot economy, it's always better to have another gig lined up before taking the leap – worst-case scenario, it'll keep you from starving, and best-case scenario, it'll make sure that you're moving into a role that will satisfy you, not just running as fast you can from a job you hate. Sometimes, however, you have to make a leap. The goal in that situation is to make sure that you've thought it through before you make an irrevocable decision – and to cushion your landing before you jump.