4 Legal Decisions That Fell on the Side of Workers in 2015

Some of the legal decisions that were made in 2015 didn't do much to help workers. For example, Wisconsin was added to the list of Right-to-Work states this year. Many feel that these laws, which change how unions collect fees from the workers they represent, hurt unions and the middle class. In other disappointing news, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Integrity Staffing Solutions vs. Busk case, mandating that companies are not required to compensate workers for the time they spend in security-screening at the end of their shifts – or for any task that's not an "integral and indispensable" part of their job, for that matter. But thankfully, the legal news for workers wasn't all bad this past year. So, let's focus on the good, shall we?

Does Your Employer Respect Your Rights as a Breastfeeding Mother?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) gives working mothers rights so they can pump milk and breastfeed their children. These rights went into effect in 2010. Unfortunately, many employers behave as if these rights do not exist. In addition, the law lacks teeth; there is not much in the way of enforcement at this time. The growing numbers of working mothers filing suit against their employers may, with any luck, have an effect upon how nursing mothers are treated at work.

We Are Free to Exploit You

Those who would like to dismantle labor unions are on the attack. As more states consider enacting right to work laws, people on both sides of the argument are disseminating information and misinformation in an attempt to rally others to their cause. It's too easy to lose sight of the forest for the trees. It's good to know who is behind efforts to disable unions and what their full agenda is.