Report: Technology Is Creating Jobs, Not Eliminating Them

A recent Deloitte study based on 140 years of England and Wales census data found that technology has produced more new jobs than made existing ones obsolete. This is particularly true of "caring" occupations that require cognitive thinking, such as nurses and teachers, as opposed to "muscle power" occupations, such as weavers and metal-makers, which are more easily replaced by machinery. In other words, as long as we have brains and do our best to maximize their potential, we may not need to be terrified that we will be replaced by robots. While it's important to keep in mind that the Deloitte economists' assessment is limited to the U.K. workforce and thus not necessarily indicative of larger global trends, the study's findings do paint an overall rosier picture of technology's impact on human-occupied occupations in comparison to other recent studies.

The Robots Are Coming! 5 Jobs That Will Be Replaced in the Future

If you're a working person, you probably already know that you're not indispensable. There's always someone coming up behind you on the ladder, with newer skills and lower salary expectations. In the future, however, you might not be competing solely with other humans. Jobs ranging from cleaning person to airline pilot could be taken over by robotics, reports Mashable, citing an Oxford Research prediction that 45 percent of U.S. jobs could be computer-automated by 2033.

Here’s Why Robots Might Not Take Our Jobs

Robots have been taking jobs from humans for decades now, replacing bank tellers with ATMs, cashiers with self-checkout machines, and factory workers with mechanized assembly lines. The fear, of course, is that the bots will grow so intelligent -- and low-maintenance from a management perspective -- that they'll replace us altogether. In a recent New York Times column, Neil Irwin explains why that might not be as likely as some naysayers predict. Why? For one thing, robots don't have a lot of common sense.

Technology Giveth Jobs and It Taketh Them Away

We've all read the studies showing that machines are expected to take over millions of jobs from humans in the not-so-far future, suggesting that a terrifying I, Robot type of world awaits us. But do we really need to fear competition from robots?