What’s With the Hieroglyphics, ‘Merica? 5 Tips For Writing With Real Words

Get out your iPhone or your stone slab. We write with pictures now.

When a friend told me recently that the youth these days use emojis to build phrases, like how we use words to make a sentence, my response was, "Really? Are we going back to hieroglyphics?"

I checked in with my 20-something cousin, and apparently this is a sensation that has been sweeping the nation for a while. A tech recruiter I know describes emoji conversations as "an interpretive dance." These artful statements may send the correct message or they may not. It's all about interpretation.

Baby Might Have Back, But Your Resume Shouldn’t Have Any ‘Buts’

My father is a television fanatic — he always has been and likely always will be. Because of that, he often quotes various catchphrases that he finds humorous, attempting to take on the inflections of a specific actor's (or sometimes actress') voice. During the '90s, I was forced to endure countless repetitions of "Did I do that?" (thanks, Mr. Urkel), and before that, there were many, many John Wayne quotes.

Bernie Sanders Proposes Free Tuition, But Can It Work?

You've probably already heard about Sen. Bernie Sanders' free-college tuition bill, which that promises a tuition-free education, so students can attend state colleges or universities with little cost. It sounds like a great idea, right? We'd no longer be able to complain about all the uneducated masses. Every student would have access to training to land them a career they'd love, without the burden of crushing student loan debt. Employers would have access to a more highly skilled pool of applicants. Eventually, even the economy as a whole could improve. So why isn't everyone on board?

When It Comes to Job Skills, American Millennials Are in a Race to the Bottom

The youngest workers, the ones who grew up alongside the latest and greatest technologies, have always been assumed to be more skilled in their use. It's probably been like this since the invention of the typewriter, but it's increasingly true now, in an era when most office jobs rely on digital technologies that adapt seemingly by the minute. In addition, today's young workers are more educated than ever before, boasting more years of education than any previous generation. There's just one problem: recent research shows that Gen Y workers in the U.S. are anything but highly skilled.

Is the Skills Gap a Myth?

In a recent Manpower survey, 40 percent of employers said they had trouble finding qualified applicants for open jobs. On the other hand, David Nicklaus at The St. Louis Post-Dispatch points out, we have a 6.2 percent unemployment rate -- better than the recession, obviously, but still "too high in the sixth year of an economic recovery." How can we account for the simultaneous existence of a high unemployment rate and employers who say they can't find workers qualified for jobs?

PayScale at SXSW: Vote to Find Out How to Get the Career of Your Dreams

Over the past few years, South by Southwest has grown from a music festival into a multi-disciplinary cultural event. Whatever you're interested in -- film, education, the environment, or emerging technologies -- you can bet there's an upcoming panel devoted to innovations that will change that field. This year, PayScale has two panels up for consideration, both focusing on how education and training can help you get the job you want and money you deserve.

#PayChat: The Skills Gap

There are many factors that contribute to the skills gap. The issue is complex. On the one hand, employers believe that educational institutions are not preparing students for careers in today’s work world. On the other hand, colleges and universities say that it is their job to teach students how to think and not to provide practical job training. Schools believe that many companies have cut back on job training due to budget restraints. Whose responsibility is it to ensure that recent graduates are prepared for today’s work world?

The Skills Gap Might Be a ‘Zombie Idea’

The popular theory is that there's a "skills gap," a wide gulf between those looking for a job and the necessary know-how and certification that employers require. This trope has become a fixture in most media coverage of the economy and the plight of the long-term unemployed. Today, in a New York Times op ed, Paul Krugman explains why it just might be nonsense.

When Should You Think About Changing Your Career?

Your last week on the job has been completely frustrating. Nothing seems to be good enough for the boss. Maybe this is not the career you want to be in; maybe you’d be happier doing something else. Maybe you should get back to painting, or doing theater, something you were passionate about in school. But hold on, don’t quit just yet. Here are a few tips that would help figure out if a career switch is right for you.

What if All the Good Jobs Disappear?

You spend years acquiring a specialized skill. You go to school, land the coveted internship and then, your professional coming-of-age. You get the gig. After some time in the field, there's some technological breakthrough. It's exciting, historic and ... it puts you out of a job. Sound familiar?