Avoid These 5 LinkedIn Mistakes

LinkedIn is a powerful networking tool, but like all tools, it's only as good as the person who wields it. Used well, LinkedIn can help you find a new job, hire fresh talent, or just strengthen your professional connections. But, in order to fully maximize the experience, you need a strong profile and a clear goal. You also need to avoid a few common LinkedIn mistakes that most users don't even realize they're making.

PayScale’s VIP Blog Roundup: To Be a Strong Leader, Embrace Vulnerability

When is strength actually a weakness? When it's a facade of toughness, rather than the real deal. This special kind of workplace machismo can keep leaders from asking questions, and when it does, real problems result, both for companies and for the individual who's trying so hard to project strength. In this week's roundup, we look at ways to embrace vulnerability, plus how to get along better with co-workers, and the big mistakes you're probably making on social media, right now.

How to Tell If It’s Time to Switch Careers

Are you contemplating whether now's the right time to switch careers? If so, then you should know that there's a right way to change careers, and a wrong way. Here's what you need to know to ensure that you are well prepared to make a seamless transition into your new dream career, sooner than later.

Oregon to Employers: No, You Can’t Make Workers Have a Facebook Account

Technology moves faster than law. As a result, the era of social media has been a tricky one for workers' rights. Various state and federal courts have settled questions about whether employers can ask their employees for access to their accounts and whether complaining about work on social networks counts as collective bargaining. The latest frontier in social media-related employment law: mandating that workers maintain social media accounts in the first place.

PayScale’s VIP Blog Roundup: How to Talk to Your College Grad About Getting a Job

What's the difference between guiding and nagging? If you're a parent, the answer probably is, "Depends on the day." There are few times more challenging to parents of grownup kids than the period after graduation, when their newly minted grads head into an unknown future (and possibly back to their childhood bedroom). The challenge, of course, from a parent's perspective, is how to encourage them in their budding career, without driving them nuts. This week, we look at Kelsey Manning's advice for parents of recent grads. Plus: tips for brand-new Twitter users, and how to answer the dreaded question, "Don't you think you're overqualified?"

Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression

Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.

5 Takeaways From One Teacher’s Social Media Experiment for Her Students

One Minnesota high school teacher, Michelle Van Bibber of Stewartville High School, decided to teach her students a valuable lesson about over-sharing on social media and how quickly things can go viral on the Internet. The lesson learned that day is one that doesn't just apply to our younger generations -- especially, it concerns working professionals who may not be convinced that their posts could negatively affect their careers.