Why Working at a Startup Is the Best (and the Worst)

Even post-dot com bubble burst, there are lots of startup opportunities in almost every industry imaginable. You don’t have to live in Silicon Valley to work at one, either. A startup can be any young company just making the leap …

Looking for a Job? Request an Uber

Job hunting can get pretty monotonous: open up your computer, tweak your cover letter, change a bullet point, re-enter your job history, answer a couple of ridiculous questions, and then never hear back. It may seem like the system is set up to keep you from connecting with jobs that really suit you. But what if you could find job listings in places you'd never expect? What if they came to you in the midst of your day-to-day life? It's not as uncommon as you'd think.

The Hidden Challenges of Working in 2015 and Beyond

The words "workplace" and "office" don't conjure up simple imagery quite the way they used to. Some people work for startups that grow and change faster than employees can adjust. Other folks are freelancers or work from home for their companies. Still others are working full-time while also pursuing degrees, and trying to find a way to make it all work. No matter the case, the office life of today is very different than it used to be. And, no matter which work situation you find yourself in, that particular environment has its benefits and its drawbacks. Let's take a closer look at a few of the nontraditional employment situations available to today's workers. There may be more to these arrangements than meets the eye.

6 Questions to Ask Before You Join a Startup

Working at a startup is often quite an attractive proposition – the coolness factor, the chance to work on new projects with new people, the rush and all the excitement that comes with it. But before you take the plunge, make sure you have the answers to these questions at the very least.

7 Reasons Why You Should Work at a Startup

Let me start by saying that working in a startup is a high-risk, high-reward game and not everyone can make that switch. If you click with the employer, the rewards are huge, but if you don't, well … hopefully you've gained something from the experience. If you are willing to take a risk, the learning you gain from the startup can be very enriching.

How I Got My Dream Job: Carlo Chalisea, Founder/Owner/Chef at Don Lucho’s Food Truck

Carlo Chalisea served Don Lucho's first sandwich off the grill himself in August of 2013. Now, two years later, the 30-year-old Seattle-based chef and entrepreneur is slanging his imaginative Rococo and Aji Amarillo-smothered Chicharron and Lomo Saltado creations to sandwich-loving Seattleites all over town as many as five days a week, and has trouble keeping up with demand even after hiring multiple employees. As one of the only authentic Peruvian food options in an area where the South American country’s cuisine is still largely unknown, the mobile sandwichera, which is named after Chalisea's father, has been growing apace with the local food truck scene as a whole, which exploded following the Seattle City Council’s unanimous vote to allow mobile food vendors to sell on public streets in 2011 (the state’s legalization of recreational marijuana in 2012 couldn’t have hurt things, either). At least some of the sandwich truck’s growth is the result of carving out a unique niche within the city’s larger mobile food community by way of standing gigs at local breweries, which have, like the trucks, been cropping up like wildfire in recent years. Along with this fortuitous strategy, the majority of his savings, and good old fashioned hard work, Chalisea credits Don Lucho’s success to innovative takes on his mom's family recipes, and a passionate dream to bring his Peruvian culture and cuisine to his hometown.