The Top 5 Dangerous Jobs in the US

You might think that jobs involving training animals, working on highways, or fighting crime might be the most dangerous of all, but it's not true. A recent Forbes article sifted through 2014 data just released from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. It ranked the top jobs in America for job-related fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers. Here's a breakdown of the five most dangerous jobs you may or may not want to work.

The Best Teams Have Women on Them

Working in groups is part of everyday life, both personally and professionally. For instance, a family must work as a unit to maintain an orderly household, and, likewise, professionals must utilize teamwork to accomplish company goals. So, what makes a group successful? One study found the secret ingredient: the more women, the better.

Working Moms Are Still Getting the Short End of the Stick

Let's face the facts: being a working mother is exhausting and, oftentimes, completely defeating. Many women put their own career and life aspirations on hold to raise children, but very few of these ladies actually speak openly about the endless struggles they face on a daily basis. Here are the facts that you should know about the realities of working mothers and what you can do to help.

Will You Change Careers in 2015?

You know the saying: "A new year. A new you." Why not apply that to your career, too? If you're looking for a career change in the new year, then you might want to check out the top occupations the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects as the most promising, broken down by highest paying, fastest growing, and most new availabilities.

Job Stress Is Killing Your Career and Your Health

As if you didn't already know, the costs of job stress are high when it comes to both your personal and your professional life. We’ll take a look at what some of the most stressful jobs are in America, and also provide ways to cope with the strain of your 9-to-5.

Why Is There No Salary Standard Deviation on PayScale?

I am sometimes asked, "why doesn't the PayScale Salary Report and Research Center show the standard deviation of the data? (See Wikipedia for the (useless) mathematical definition of standard deviation.)

People are are interested in the standard deviation, because it attempts to give the typical variation in salaries. The first thing they calculate with it is a typical range of salaries, by simply adding and subtracting it from the mean.