Report: Student Jobs Should Build Careers After Graduation

The financial reality facing today's college students is pretty different than it was decades ago. First of all, the cost of higher education has skyrocketed. The price of attending a private, nonprofit, four-year college, for example, has more than tripled since 1975. And, while the image of the full-time, parent-supported college student who starts working only after completing her degree was never the only reality for students, today's learners must deal with the fact that they can't even hope to work their way through school. Worst of all, perhaps: the student jobs they're likely to find won't boost their careers after graduation.

Nontraditional College Students Are the New Normal

The landscape of higher education is changing. Online learning options, the high cost of tuition, fading tenure programs for professors – today's college experience looks very different than the one students encountered 15 or 20 years ago. But, maybe some of these changes were designed to address what might be the biggest change of all: the change in the students themselves. Let's take a closer look at today's college students in an attempt to get a better sense of how their circumstances and objectives have shifted in recent years.

Is Capping Student Loans at $10K a Good Idea?

Recently, billionaire investor Mark Cuban declared that fixing the student debt crisis is the most important thing our government can do to restore the national economy. His idea: cap federal student loans at $10,000 per student, per year. Few would argue that student loan debt isn’t a problem of epic proportions, but Cuban’s explanation of the crisis and his solution resulted in mixed reactions.

Highly Educated and Unemployed? Here’s How to Bounce Back Financially

An advanced degree might boost your earnings, but it can't protect you entirely from a bad job market. According to a new study, close to 20 percent of those currently unemployed are former high earners with advanced degrees – and many are also still stuck with student loan debt. This new problem is creating what some call a new class of Americans who are "downward financially mobile." If you're among this group, here's what to do to better your situation.

Comedian John Oliver Skewers For-Profit Colleges

Sunday’s Last Week Tonight delivered a 16 minute tongue lashing directed at for-profit colleges and their role in the student debt crisis. The schools have been at the center of a congressional investigation and have been called into question by the media and the public for their recruiting tactics and student loan practices. Host John Oliver didn’t hold back in his recap of the situation.

American-Sized Student Loan Debt for Australians?

Australians have found themselves in the middle of a debate not unlike the ongoing dispute in the U.S. over the cost of higher education. This year, the Australian government unveiled a proposal that would allow universities to raise tuition without any regulatory restraints. Officials say the changes would make schools more competitive, but opponents believe college in Australia will become unaffordable.

Should Colleges Be Held Accountable for the Success of Students?

It’s been a year since the White House announced its plan for a new college rating system and most college presidents still don’t love it. The idea of being held accountable for the success of students doesn’t sit well with many administrators. Yet, with student debt mounting, full-time professors dwindling, and the cost of tuition skyrocketing, colleges may have to get comfortable with showing they’re worth it.

Student Loan Bill Introduced by Marco Rubio and Mark Warner

A bipartisan effort addressing the student loan crisis is underway with new legislation aimed at making payments more manageable and reducing defaults. The Dynamic Repayment Act was introduced in the Senate last week by Senators Marco Rubio (R-Fl.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.). Struggling borrowers are no doubt hopeful about possible relief, but no one should hold their breath. Congress will still have to approve.

Wealthy College Presidents May Be the Reason You’re Broke [infographic]

A recent report released by the Institute for Policy Studies finds that student debt and low-wage faculty labor are rising faster at state universities with the highest-paid presidents. Usually those three hotly debated issues: student debt, increased use of part-time faculty, and inflated executive pay are discussed as separate issues, but researchers wondered if the three were related. What they found shows that all three are connected in ways worthy of a Charles Dickens novel.

American Student Loan Debt [infographic]

It is common practice for students to take out a loan when needing to pay the tuition for their post-secondary education. However, more and more students are finding themselves under piles of debt when they are ready to begin their new lives as professionals. The infographic below from Online Colleges takes a deeper look at student loan debt in the U.S.

What We Can Learn From Australia’s Student Loan System?

The student financial aid program is far from perfect. It doesn't fit in with the modern world, where students are also part-time employees and sometimes even parents who need to take a semester off here and there to deal with other aspects of life. The answer to our financial aid problems, however, might come from Australia.