How to Keep Productivity Apps From Destroying Your Productivity

Picture this: It's 6:32 a.m. Your Sleep Cycle alarm knows this is the perfect 15-minute interval of light sleep in which take wake you up. You go into the bathroom and stream your favorite new album on Spotify Premium through your bluetooth speakers. You get in the car, and Waze helps you navigate the least-trafficked route to work. Before you know it, you're at your desk and have Trello, Asana, and Evernote all coordinating your tasks, projects, and notes. iCalendar pops up on your phone to remind you of that lunch meeting you scheduled last week. Your team hops on Slack every so often to check in, and soon enough it's time to go home. You order some dinner on Seamless, and as you're falling asleep you watch that new Netflix show you've been meaning to get to on your iPad. Your life is now run by apps. But is it really that much more efficient?

How the Working World Has Changed Since the ’70s

Let's face it, if you were sitting in an office in the '70s, imagining what the working world would be like in 2016, I doubt you'd conceive of the changes that would take place in just 40 years. Before we even begin to talk about the internet, let's talk about clothes, job types, and yep, money.

Report: Technology Is Creating Jobs, Not Eliminating Them

A recent Deloitte study based on 140 years of England and Wales census data found that technology has produced more new jobs than made existing ones obsolete. This is particularly true of "caring" occupations that require cognitive thinking, such as nurses and teachers, as opposed to "muscle power" occupations, such as weavers and metal-makers, which are more easily replaced by machinery. In other words, as long as we have brains and do our best to maximize their potential, we may not need to be terrified that we will be replaced by robots. While it's important to keep in mind that the Deloitte economists' assessment is limited to the U.K. workforce and thus not necessarily indicative of larger global trends, the study's findings do paint an overall rosier picture of technology's impact on human-occupied occupations in comparison to other recent studies.

10 Female STEM Stars Under 30

Women make up only 24 percent of the STEM workforce in the US, according to the Department of Commerce, and some fields are worse than others. Women represent only 14 percent of the country's engineers, but make up 47 percent of mathematicians and statisticians, 47 percent of life scientists, and 63 percent of social scientists. But as these rising stars of the tech industry show, women are making an impact on STEM. Given the impressive laundry list of accomplishments already made by all of the women on our list at such a young age, it's safe to say that both they and their careers are something to watch.

5 Reasons Why STEM Has a Woman Problem

How is it that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) companies can find solutions for some of the world's most complex problems, but they can't seem to solve the gender bias issue that keeps women out of STEM careers? According to new research, it's because we, as a culture, don't know that there's even a problem – it's unconscious, and we're all to blame.