Phasing Out Tipping Culture Could Reduce Workplace Harassment

It's been dubbed the glass floor by some, and accepted as a reality of the American economy by many: tipping often makes up the bulk of pay for employees in the food service and hospitality industries. In fact, in many states, it's legal to pay tipped employees as little as $2.13 an hour, the federal tipped minimum wage. As a result, servers have to rely on customers' good graces to make up their paycheck – a situation that often leaves tipped workers vulnerable to sexual harassment.

Should We Ban Tipping?

Few debates have become as contentious as this one. Ask any server, and they'll more likely than not want to smack you. Ask the patron who just tacked an extra $20 onto their dinner tab after a nice evening out, and they'll probably breathe out a desperate, "Oh, please!" With $15 cocktails and far-less-than-minimum-wage hourly rates, it's easy to sympathize with both sides. But it's more complicated than just tip or no tip.

Tipping Etiquette: Who should you tip and how much?

During the holiday season, the notion of tipping those who provide you service becomes a hot topic. However, it is important to remember that tips are a year-round affair for many. The questions that plague most people are: "Who do I tip?" and "How much do I tip them?"

Fear not, for PayScale is to the rescue. We recently released our 5th annual Tipping Study that answers these questions and then some. In this post, I will highlight interesting results from our study, as well as detail the methodology.

Do you work in a job where tips are commonplace and are wondering how your pay fares? Find out with a free PayScale salary report.