PayScale’s VIP Blog Roundup: Is Your LinkedIn Profile Helping Other People Get Hired?

Recruiters do not care about you. OK, that sounds harsh. A better way of putting it might be, "Recruiters care about finding stellar candidates, which may or may not include you." The goal when you're buffing up your LinkedIn profile is to make sure that it's driving recruiters toward you, and not toward your friends and colleagues. In this week's roundup, we look at expert advice that will help you tighten up the leaks in your Linkedin, plus how to deal with a toxic work environment, and which questions to ask in order to start off a new job on the right foot.

5 Signs You’re in a Toxic Work Environment

Even if you absolutely love your job, there's always going to be something about it that you wish you could change. That's the ideal scenario; if you're lucky, you have an issue or two that you'd like to resolve, but nothing that impacts your job satisfaction as a whole. On the other hand, if your problems are beyond minor complaints – if you feel threatened, suffocated, or compromised on your principles, work ethic, or professional and personal well-being – you may be working in a toxic environment.

Stop Doing These 3 Toxic Things at Work

Some work behavior is poisonous to your career. Do certain things and act in certain ways, and you'll not only tank your own chances at promotion -- you'll destroy the productivity and job satisfaction of those around you, as well. Here's what you need to stop doing, right away, to get ahead without destroying your social capital with your colleagues.

How to Deal With Negative People in the Workplace

Negative people obstruct productivity in the workplace in a handful of ways. Their pessimism serves as a buzzkill when, every time you suggest an idea or improvement, they say, "No, that will never work." Complaining and gossiping at the office undermines morale, which also undermines productivity. If you can't get away from these folks, you need reasonable strategies to deal with them.

3 Ways to Manage Your Difficult Boss

Americans who work full-time may spend more time interacting with co-workers and managers than with their own family and friends. Their relationships at work, however, are far different than with trusted friends. When bosses are difficult people, workers often do not have the freedom to confront them or to demand to be treated with common courtesy. For those employees who are not lucky enough to work for polite people, these three strategies may help them maintain their sanity.

5 Signs Your Workplace Is Psychologically Unhealthy

Work is work, and most adults understand that they need not be best friends with their co-workers and managers. We go to work to utilize specific skills, do a good job, and receive compensation. We are not there to sing kumbaya and give each other warm fuzzies. However, there is such as thing as a toxic workplace. If your workplace shows a majority of these five signs of toxicity, you may be working in a psychologically unhealthy environment.