3 Ways Colleges Are Wasting Your Money

Want to get mad? If you have ever attended or plan to attend college, take a look at a Ted Scheinman's recent Pacific Standard article, entitled How Colleges Misspend Your Tuition Money. The URL, which includes the phrase "pay for decent teachers, not Dr. Phil," gives the first hint of what lies ahead. Hint: it's not a sound investment in teaching staff, but if you've talked to any underpaid, untenured adjunct faculty lately, you probably already knew that.

5 Tips on Choosing a College: Confessions of an Art School Grad

By now, we probably all know someone who struggles with student loan debt or job woes. Many of us young folk went to college hoping to make our dreams come true, only to find ourselves saddled with enormous debt and no job prospects. Young grads are still having trouble nailing down that first professional job, and many people aren't working in the industries they trained for. It wasn't exactly a walk in the park for older people either, whose careers went kaput and they had to go back to school or get new training. Stories from the Great Recession are many among us.

American-Sized Student Loan Debt for Australians?

Australians have found themselves in the middle of a debate not unlike the ongoing dispute in the U.S. over the cost of higher education. This year, the Australian government unveiled a proposal that would allow universities to raise tuition without any regulatory restraints. Officials say the changes would make schools more competitive, but opponents believe college in Australia will become unaffordable.

Starbucks Offers Free Online College Classes to Employees

Want to get that bachelor's degree you’ve always wanted, but couldn’t afford? Become a barista. The Starbucks Corporation announced Monday that it's going to finance online degrees for employees via Arizona State University. The Starbucks College Achievement Plan, the first of its kind, will be available to U.S. Starbucks employees working at least 20 hours a week.

FAFSA Facts: 3 Tips for Getting the Most Money From Federal Financial Aid

Graduate and undergraduate students seeking financial aid must fill out the FAFSA: Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The FAFSA is need-based, meaning the amount of aid students receive is dependent upon their financial situation, not their grades or achievements. FAFSA has a few quirks that savvy students can take advantage of in order to increase their likelihood of getting the money they need for their education.