How to Tweet for the Queen (or Any Other Celebrity)

Nearly three in five millennials have a Twitter account. While the company may have reported less-than-stellar numbers in the last quarter, it's certainly a brand that Americans in 2016 are quite familiar with. And even if you aren't among of the scores of active users, some interesting new job opportunities may convince you to get familiar with the social media platform, namely: you could be tweeting for the Queen of England.

Twitter Offers 20 Weeks of Paid Parental Leave for Moms and Dads

Families were never as "traditional" as politicians or 20th century stereotypes would have us believe. Throughout human history, primary caregivers have come in all shapes, sizes, genders, and ages. Until recently, however, it was pretty hard for even high-earning executives at elite U.S. companies to get paid time off for a new baby – especially if they weren't female and/or hadn't given birth to the child. But all that is changing. Today, Twitter joins the ranks of tech companies like Facebook, Netflix, and Microsoft, in offering fully paid parental leave for any parent who wants time off to care for a new baby.

How to Handle an Intern Who Crosses the Line

The story of Aran Khanna has garnered a lot of attention in recent weeks, as details have surfaced surrounding how and why he lost his prestigious Facebook internship: he created an app that took advantage of a flaw in Facebook's messaging app, allowing him to scrape the location data of any given user (friends or not) and pinpoint their whereabouts within a meter. Though Facebook has known of the flaw for several years, it was Khanna's app's popularity that provoked them to patch it — and the events surrounding his internship have prompted a national debate about Facebook's ability to handle our private data. So why fire him?

Tweet Like a Man, and Get More Retweets

A recent study showed that men get retweeted more than women. The question is, why? We'll examine the science behind why tweets published by men are, on average, more popular than those by women and how professionals can apply this knowledge to their enhance their career potential, regardless of gender.

Laid Off? This App Aims to Help You Beat Depression

Social media has an amazing ability to connect people; however, with that comes both good and bad. The bad part is that anyone and everyone has the freedom to voice whatever opinion their little hearts desire, which promotes cyber bullying and allows other negativity to spread online. The good part is, the convenience and connectivity of social networks allow like-minded people to communicate, share, and help one another. One psychologist and MIT grad student, Robert Morris, used the positive aspects of social networking to formulate a site incorporating crowdsourced cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to help users "debug" their negative thoughts and overcome depression.

What Your Tweets and Posts Tell Recruiters Could Keep You From Getting the Job

Would you think twice about sharing a mindless "I'm so bored" post on social media if you knew that research shows that people who do so experience higher rates of heart attacks and strokes? What's worse, research that ties social media use to emotional stability/instability is making its way into the hands of people that you probably don't want to be privy to such information: recruiters, hiring managers, and employers. Here's what you need to know about what your social media sharing is saying about you.

#PayChat: College ROI

How does where or what you study in college affect your career? Do you need to go back to school or can you learn how to make a successful career with a degree you already have?

10 Career Lessons From #ReasonYouWereFiredInTwoWords

The last thing you should do, if you get fired, is tweet about it -- especially in the heat of the moment, when you're embarrassed and trying to gather up the tattered bits of your dignity. If you've got a severance package, blabbing could even jeopardize it. No matter what, you want to look professional. No one wants to hire the person who complained about their former employer on social media, even if that employer really deserved it.