Scalia’s Passing Likely Means Public-Sector Unions Survive to Fight Again

Prior to the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court seemed poised to limit the rights of unions to charge non-union members "agency" or "fair share" fees covering the costs of collective bargaining. Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, which came before the Court in January, was by all accounts headed for a 5-4 decision against the unions. Now, with Scalia's death, the vote will likely be split – and revert to the lower court's decision.

Union Membership by the Numbers

Labor unions have been in the news quite a bit lately. The Supreme Court is reviewing a case that could mean the end for certain public-sector unions. And, it seems there is some general concern about how these organizations will adapt to a changing economy. So, let's put all of the emotion surrounding the topic of modern trade unions aside and focus on some facts, in order to gain some clarity on the state of today's labor unions.

Could This Be the Beginning of the End for Certain Public-Sector Unions?

Labor unions have had a tremendous impact on U.S. workers and workplaces for well over a century. But, it's no secret that unions, in general, are in a bit of trouble these days. And, certain public-sector unions, specifically, could be about to sustain a punishing blow from the U.S. Supreme Court. Let's take a closer look at the case of Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association. Here's what you need to know.

How the Working World Has Changed Since the ’70s

Let's face it, if you were sitting in an office in the '70s, imagining what the working world would be like in 2016, I doubt you'd conceive of the changes that would take place in just 40 years. Before we even begin to talk about the internet, let's talk about clothes, job types, and yep, money.

Why Unions Need Saving, and Why Millennials Might Be the Best Ones to Do It

Labor unions have a long history in this country of protecting workers. Unions protect workers' collective bargaining powers and help them negotiate better wages, hours, benefits, job security, and working conditions. However, these days unions are in jeopardy, and it turns out that millennials could be the ones to save them. Let's take a closer look at this issue, beginning by examining some of the reasons why unions are in trouble.

Why Unions Need Saving, and Why Millennials Might Be the Best Ones to Do It

Labor unions have a long history in this country of protecting workers. Unions protect workers' collective bargaining powers and help them negotiate better wages, hours, benefits, job security, and working conditions. However, these days unions are in jeopardy, and it turns out that millennials could be the ones to save them. Let's take a closer look at this issue, beginning by examining some of the reasons why unions are in trouble.

Why an Improved Economy Doesn’t Necessarily Mean Raises for Workers

There have been a lot of positive signs lately regarding the state of the economy. Perhaps the two strongest indicators are that the unemployment rate is down, and the GDP is up. (This quarter, it rose beyond what was predicted.) Despite this growth, many workers haven't noticed much change to their paychecks. This fact has left a lot of folks wondering: if the economy is improving, why aren't our paychecks doing the same?

The Pros and Cons of Unions Today

The labor movement has given the American worker benefits that today are often taken for granted, such as overtime laws, child labor laws, and minimum wages. The right to bargain collectively gives employees the power to demand reasonable treatment without the threat of being replaced by somebody less noisy. However, unions are far from perfect.