The 5 Best High Schools in the U.S., According to U.S. News

High school students in the U.S. have a college readiness problem. According to a report from testing organization ACT, only 40 percent of students taking the ACT met three or four college readiness benchmarks, which correlate with stronger likelihood of success in postsecondary education. However, taking college preparatory core curriculum classes increased students' chances of meeting these benchmarks; 49 percent of "core-taking" students met the math benchmark, for example, compared to 27 percent of non-core-taking students. In short, academic preparation in high school is essential to a good college experience – and a successful career after graduation.

Is College Still Worth the Money?

From 2004 to 2014, the average debt for graduating college seniors who took out loans rose at twice the rate of inflation. Meanwhile, the real value of workers' wages is 6.5 percent lower today than it was in 2006, and recent college graduates are more likely to be unemployed or underemployed than they were prior to the recession. It's not unreasonable to look at the data and ask, "Is going to college a good investment for today's young workers?"

College ROI Report: Highest Student Loan Payments Made By Those Who Can Least Afford Them

College may be more expensive than ever before, but the cost of not going to college is pretty steep, as well. For the most part, college graduates earn more, have lower unemployment rates, and are less likely to live in poverty than their less-educated peers. But that doesn't mean that it's easy to pay student loans with a recent graduate's salary (or potential lack thereof, depending on the job market upon graduation). In fact, PayScale's College ROI Report shows that the highest college loans are likely to be held by the borrowers with the lowest income.

College ROI Report: These 5 Schools Offer the Highest Return on Investment

Money might not buy happiness, but lack of money can sure set you up for a world of misery. Just ask any of the 6.9 million Americans – as of July, 2015 – who hadn't made a payment on their federal students in 360 days. In fact, about 17 percent of all borrowers were severely delinquent in paying their student loans last year. Why? Well, for one thing, it's hard to stay on top of your loans if you can't get a job with a salary high enough to pay them.

For this reason, PayScale's College ROI Report is a valuable tool for entering students. While of course college choice needs to be based on a variety of factors like career goals, interests, and aptitude, thinking about life after graduation, professionally and financially, is also key. College isn't just vocational training, but if you're going to get into debt, you need to set yourself up to get a job that will allow you to pay off those loans.

2016 PayScale College ROI Report Shows How Household Income Affects Earnings After Graduation

The poor often stay poor – even if they're college graduates. This year, for the first time, PayScale's annual College ROI Report looks at how household income prior to attending college relates to income after graduation. In short, students who enter college from lower-income households don't see the same return on their tuition investment as students who start off with more money in their pockets.

#ThisPsychMajor Agrees With Jeb Bush — Sort Of

At a recent town hall event, Jeb Bush said that psych majors "end up working at Chick-fil-A." He went on to add that, "I just don't think people are getting jobs as psych majors." As a fully employed former psychology major, I have to say I resent that. In fact, I've written before on how to turn your psych major into a lucrative career, demonstrating that it's entirely possible to find employment outside the retail sector. But that doesn't mean that getting a job with a bachelor's in psychology is easy.

Does College Major Matter?

If you went by the amount of attention it receives during the college selection process, choice of major would be the most important decision you ever made in your life, right up there with whom you marry and whether to choose a city based on its most popular food product. (For the record, Philadelphians, you might be on to something with the cheesesteak.) The real question, of course, is does major matter more than other factors?

How to Avoid Having to Sell Your Diploma on eBay

We live in a very strange world, in which going to college can feel like more of a gamble than hitting the blackjack table at Vegas. How can you really be sure that all your hard-earned – and more to the point, hard-borrowed – dollars are going to an investment that will pay off? More on that in a minute, but first: meet Stephanie Ritter, a college graduate whose underemployment situation got so dire, she decided to put her diploma up on eBay, at a price tag of $50,000, to defray the cost of her loans.

UCI Introduces a New Program to Make It Easier for Humanities PhDs to Get Hired

Earning a PhD in philosophy from a prestigious university is a noble endeavor, but when it can take upwards of a decade and over $100,000 in tuition to earn that degree, and studies show that job prospects drop the longer students take to complete their degrees, does it still make sense in today's economy? At The University of California, Irvine, school administrators just introduced a unique new PhD program in certain humanities fields that aims to increase financial support, lessen the student debt load and increase hiring prospects for students.

Want to Make Bank? Avoid These 5 Graduate Degrees

Grad school can make or break your career. Choose the right advanced degree, and you can skyrocket to success; choose the wrong one, and you'll rack up debt, but see little payoff. Recently, PayScale helped Fortune crunch some numbers to determine the best and worst graduate degrees out there, with potential income being the most critical factor. While there's obviously more to consider than just cost, it's important to keep in mind how much debt you're getting into – and therefore how much you'll have to make to pay it back – as average tuition for a graduate degree runs $36,000 to $63,000 a year.