What We Can Learn From WalletHub’s Best and Worst Cities for Women-Owned Businesses

Starting a new business is anything but easy. It requires fierce motivation, novel ideas, capital, not to mention some jumping-through-of-hoops to get all of your appropriate paperwork together. For women business leaders, the challenge may be even a little greater. In response to this, WalletHub recently compiled their list of 2016's Best and Worst Cities for Women-Owned Businesses.

To See How Few Women There Are at the Top, Photoshop Out the Men

If you watched the Democratic primary debate last night, one thing probably stood out to you, regardless of your political leanings: Hillary Clinton was the only woman on the stage. In fact, as far as American politics is concerned, one out of five is just about the norm: currently, women hold 104 out of 535 seats in Congress, a 19.4 percent average. (It gets worse if you look at women of color – 31.7 percent of the number of women, and just 6.2 percent of the total.) Of course, we love data, but numbers can seem abstract. Sometimes, you can't beat a good visualization to really see the problem. Recently, British Elle's feminism issue gave us just that, with a video that shows men gradually removed from photos of politics in action ... leaving just a few women behind.

Facebook and LinkedIn Team Up to Help Women in Tech

The two social network powerhouses, Facebook and LinkedIn, are joining forces to launch programs that will encourage more women to pursue degrees and careers in what has long been a man's world -- the world of tech. Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg (COO) and LinkedIn's Jeffrey Weiner (CEO) are launching mentoring and support programs at colleges to inspire more women to pursue tech-related education in hopes that they will, one day, fill the thousands of job availabilities in the heavily male-dominant tech industry.

The Boys Club: Now Accepting Women

Gender divides have existed for as long as anyone can remember. However, women aren't just sitting back and letting their male counterparts get all the credit -- they're making a name for themselves in these male-dominant industries.