Meet the Winners of PayScale’s Women in STEM Scholarship

Through many studies at PayScale, we have found that there are fewer women entering and staying in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) jobs, even though there is more attention on the subject than ever. Because of this, we were inspired to create a scholarship that is exclusively for women heading into STEM who plan to pursue a meaningful career in those fields. Out of over 7,000 applicants, PayScale has awarded two exceptional young women a $2,000 scholarship to help them pursue their STEM education and follow their dreams. Read about each of the scholarship winners to see why they impressed us so much.

3 Facts You Don’t Know About #WomeninSTEM

You know that STEM jobs are heavily male-dominated, and also – generally speaking – high-paying, high-growth occupations. The lack of representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math jobs is one reason why the gender pay gap persists. You've probably also heard that tech companies are trying various things to create a more diverse workforce, in terms of hiring and promoting women and people of color, from Slack's plan to build tools that catch inequities early on to Salesforce's $3 million commitment to closing its internal gender pay gap. But there's a lot you don't know about the history and current state of women in tech, in particular. Today, on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, let's take a look at some very nontrivial trivia.

10 Female STEM Stars Under 30

Women make up only 24 percent of the STEM workforce in the US, according to the Department of Commerce, and some fields are worse than others. Women represent only 14 percent of the country's engineers, but make up 47 percent of mathematicians and statisticians, 47 percent of life scientists, and 63 percent of social scientists. But as these rising stars of the tech industry show, women are making an impact on STEM. Given the impressive laundry list of accomplishments already made by all of the women on our list at such a young age, it's safe to say that both they and their careers are something to watch.

LinkedIn Is Being the Change It Wants to See for Women in Tech

The bad news is that STEM has a woman problem. The good news is that everyone is pretty aware of it now and some companies are trying to fix this problem. Last year, LinkedIn announced its Women in Tech (WIT) initiative, which aims to empower the women in tech roles at the company to transform themselves, their careers, and the company – and, by golly, it seems to be working! We'll take a look at how LinkedIn is "tackling this imbalance head-on" and making a difference for women in tech, now and in the future.