3 Facts You Don’t Know About #WomeninSTEM

You know that STEM jobs are heavily male-dominated, and also – generally speaking – high-paying, high-growth occupations. The lack of representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math jobs is one reason why the gender pay gap persists. You've probably also heard that tech companies are trying various things to create a more diverse workforce, in terms of hiring and promoting women and people of color, from Slack's plan to build tools that catch inequities early on to Salesforce's $3 million commitment to closing its internal gender pay gap. But there's a lot you don't know about the history and current state of women in tech, in particular. Today, on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, let's take a look at some very nontrivial trivia.

Ellen Pao’s Reddit Resignation Reveals the Enduring Sexism of Tech

Picture this: a new CEO makes a series of controversial changes to the company's hiring process, policies, and product. Eventually, a popular staffer is fired, and the community revolts, starting a Change.org petition, a hashtag campaign on social media, and even sending death threats. Sound surreal? It might be – if the CEO were male. As former Reddit CEO Ellen Pao's resignation demonstrates, it's not at all a strange set of circumstances for a woman in charge.

LinkedIn Is Being the Change It Wants to See for Women in Tech

The bad news is that STEM has a woman problem. The good news is that everyone is pretty aware of it now and some companies are trying to fix this problem. Last year, LinkedIn announced its Women in Tech (WIT) initiative, which aims to empower the women in tech roles at the company to transform themselves, their careers, and the company – and, by golly, it seems to be working! We'll take a look at how LinkedIn is "tackling this imbalance head-on" and making a difference for women in tech, now and in the future.

5 Reasons Why STEM Has a Woman Problem

How is it that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) companies can find solutions for some of the world's most complex problems, but they can't seem to solve the gender bias issue that keeps women out of STEM careers? According to new research, it's because we, as a culture, don't know that there's even a problem – it's unconscious, and we're all to blame.

Google Chairman Manterrupts Female Tech Leader at SXSW to Mansplain Need for Diversity in Tech

"Mansplaining" is a term coined to describe the behavior of those men who have the need to explain what they believe are complex topics, in which they may or may not be well-versed, to women in a manner that is elementary enough for even a woman to understand. This very thing happened at SXSW this week, except this time, the "manterrupter" got called out publicly. Here's how it went down.

Facebook and LinkedIn Team Up to Help Women in Tech

The two social network powerhouses, Facebook and LinkedIn, are joining forces to launch programs that will encourage more women to pursue degrees and careers in what has long been a man's world -- the world of tech. Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg (COO) and LinkedIn's Jeffrey Weiner (CEO) are launching mentoring and support programs at colleges to inspire more women to pursue tech-related education in hopes that they will, one day, fill the thousands of job availabilities in the heavily male-dominant tech industry.

Why Computer Engineer Barbie Might Be a Good Thing for Girls (Despite the Controversy)

It’s no secret that women are underrepresented in STEM fields. Diversity reports from companies such as Google and Yahoo reveal dismal numbers. While the companies themselves need to work on encouraging women to apply for and stay in computer science jobs, society as a whole will have to do better at inspiring women and girls to pursue their interest in tech. One popular way of doing so has been to use toys as role models. But as the recent flap over Computer Engineer Barbie shows, you can't just slap a new coat of paint on an old, bad idea and call it equality.