America’s Corporate Culture Is Too Stuck In Its Ways to Allow Paid Family Leave to Work

The U.S. is one of the few countries in the world that doesn't mandate any kind of paid family leave, and only 12 percent of private-sector employees in this country have access to it. This is despite the increasing number of elite employers who offer generous perks designed to improve work-life balance. What will it take for paid family leave to truly gain traction in the U.S.? Beyond a law requiring it, we'd need nothing less than a complete cultural shift. Even if paid leave were to be granted tomorrow to every employee nationwide, there's one problem that would still remain: an unsupportive corporate culture that makes it hard to take time away from work to take care of family.

What Is the Value of Emotional Labor at Work?

Remembering birthdays, planning the holiday party, showing a new team member around the office and where the best nearby coffee shop is: these are all examples of emotional labor at work. While many happy employees would like to think of themselves as completely willing to take on these seemingly small tasks, more often than not, they fall on female workers. Just as at home, the majority of this type of care and support in the workplace is expected of women in ways it might not be from their male co-workers. What's the impact of such expectation?

Cards Against Humanity’s Most Surprising Move Yet

There's a lot of bad news out there, and we seem to love to talk about it. In fact, sometimes we make things out to be a lot worse than they are. As Nicholas Kristof recently pointed out, our current political climate causes us to ignore the positive strides the world is making every day. In that light, let's take this opportunity to laud a shining example of corporate philanthropy in a place you probably wouldn't expect it: a naughty card game.

Women, Here Are 4 Ways to Stop Giving Away Power

We're taught from a young age that "femininity" is synonymous with being demure, quiet, pleasing, and friendly. But bosses often need a kind of take-charge attitude that maintains your powerful role as a knowledgeable person. So how do you keep the power and your upward mobility as a woman in the workplace? How do you avoid being stuck between a rock and the glass ceiling? Here are some tips:

The Cardinals’ New Hire Can Teach Managers All Something About Good Candidates

"Fifteen years of experience playing football, first woman to play with men, and doctorate in psychology — I hope I can figure out something to contribute in there." That's what Dr. Jen Welter had to say when a reporter asked the new Arizona Cardinals assistant coaching intern, "What can you offer?" It's the kind of question managers should be asking every candidate up for a new job — but her answer, power-packed as it is, really only scratches the surface.

A Growing Crop of Female Versions of the Old Boy’s Club Make Waves Online

From T. Swift's smoking hot girl army to Tina Fey and Amy Poehler's whip-smart comic partnership, to Zooey Deschanel, Molly McAleer, and Sophia Rossi's infectious Hello Giggles girl-power lifestyle hub, female friendship-based collaborations are nothing new. What is new is the increasing number of collaboration-based opportunities that female professionals now have that can further their careers and actually put cash in the bank. A growing crop of increasingly specialized, made-for-women-by-women virtual communities like CodeChix and The Li.st offer opportunities that range from job referrals to speaking gigs to potential investors. Read on for a round-up of veterans and newcomers both big and small.

3 Ways Veep’s Amy Brookheimer Is Every Working Woman’s Hero

Unconscious bias really screws things up for women in the workplace, but the battle is not over just yet. Thanks to the prevalence of more leading ladies on the big screen and on TV who play strong, successful working women, the unconscious bias isn't so unconscious anymore. We'll take a look at three ways Veep's powerhouse character, Amy Brookheimer, is showing working women everywhere that being tenacious, unapologetic, and "bossy" is nothing to be afraid of in their careers.