What We Can Learn From WalletHub’s Best and Worst Cities for Women-Owned Businesses

Starting a new business is anything but easy. It requires fierce motivation, novel ideas, capital, not to mention some jumping-through-of-hoops to get all of your appropriate paperwork together. For women business leaders, the challenge may be even a little greater. In response to this, WalletHub recently compiled their list of 2016's Best and Worst Cities for Women-Owned Businesses.

To See How Few Women There Are at the Top, Photoshop Out the Men

If you watched the Democratic primary debate last night, one thing probably stood out to you, regardless of your political leanings: Hillary Clinton was the only woman on the stage. In fact, as far as American politics is concerned, one out of five is just about the norm: currently, women hold 104 out of 535 seats in Congress, a 19.4 percent average. (It gets worse if you look at women of color – 31.7 percent of the number of women, and just 6.2 percent of the total.) Of course, we love data, but numbers can seem abstract. Sometimes, you can't beat a good visualization to really see the problem. Recently, British Elle's feminism issue gave us just that, with a video that shows men gradually removed from photos of politics in action ... leaving just a few women behind.

LinkedIn Is Being the Change It Wants to See for Women in Tech

The bad news is that STEM has a woman problem. The good news is that everyone is pretty aware of it now and some companies are trying to fix this problem. Last year, LinkedIn announced its Women in Tech (WIT) initiative, which aims to empower the women in tech roles at the company to transform themselves, their careers, and the company – and, by golly, it seems to be working! We'll take a look at how LinkedIn is "tackling this imbalance head-on" and making a difference for women in tech, now and in the future.

A Woman on the 20 By 2020

Times change, and our understanding of the past changes right along with it. A great many things were different, say, 100 years ago, in America. For starters, women couldn't vote. In fact, the oppression -- marginalization is way too weak a word -- of women and minority groups was so abundant 100 years ago that there is hardly a comparison between their experience then and now. So, it makes sense that we see certain things a little differently today that we did in the past.