Super Bowl Ads Show Changing Gender Roles at Home and at Work

This year's Super Bowl commercials were all about the dad-vertising. Social media spheres were in a complete uproar over the latest string of ads featuring dads who were caring for their children -- swimming, potty-training, brushing hair, comforting, and hugging. There wasn't a dry eye in the house, according to more than one post.

4 Tiny Changes That Will Help You Work Smarter, Not Harder

Many of us live to work, rather than work to live. According to the Department of Labor, the average American between the ages of 25-54 with children spends a whopping 8.7 hours on "working and related activities" each day, but only one hour on "eating and drinking" and two-and-half on "leisure and sports." While you're unlikely to convince the boss to let you cut your day short in favor of spending more time watching TV, you might be able to make a few small changes that boost productivity and get you out the door as soon as possible. Plus, if you take care of yourself, your time at work will be more pleasant.

The 10 Toughest Jobs to Fill This Year

Forty percent of employers in the U.S. have job vacancies, but can't find the skilled workers to fill them, according to the latest skills survey from staffing agency ManpowerGroup. For those of you hiding under a rock for the past half-decade, that's what we call the skills gap. The disparity between employers' need and workforce ability.

Fashion Models Strut Into U.S. More Easily Than Engineers

If you're tall, thin, gorgeous and make a living off those traits it's easier to get an American work visa than university-trained engineers. A puzzling 20-year-old decision by Congress allowed models to be included in the H-1B class of visas, an oversight that has led to relatively preferential treatment for foreign-born beauty over brain.

How Many Grads Have Jobs Related to Their Major?

A new study suggests the American workforce is remarkably over-educated and underemployed. The young adult workforce, this research claims, holds degrees, but works menial jobs that don't call for the skills they learned in college. Think the stereotypical liberal arts major serving up coffee or philosophy grad dressing storefront mannequins. But is that really the case?

Legalizing Gay Marriage is Good for Business

The Defense of Marriage Act, in addition to being a civil rights battle, has implications in the workplace, too. That's why some major companies like Disney, Amazon and Microsoft (to name a few) have submitted amicus briefs encouraging the U.S. Supreme Court to reform the meaning of federal marriage to include same-sex unions. Their argument: It's good for the country, but it's also good for business.

Federal Sequester Slashes Unemployment Checks

Politics just got a whole lot more real for anyone relying on federal jobless benefits. The much-threatened and finally-enacted sequester, an $85 billion slash-and-burn federal budget cut, started trickling down to the everyman these past two months. It translated to, among other things, some folks getting a smaller unemployment check and others being cut off entirely.

Culinary Students Fed Up with Tuition Costs

Many chefs pursue a culinary career for the art of it, not because they think they'll get rich working in a kitchen. (Well, unless you go into the field with the lofty goal of becoming a celebrity chef.) Starting salaries are miserably low and the hours are late and long. So why do chef schools charge a fortune for their typically 18-month programs?