3 Sneaky Downsides of Working at Home (and How to Handle Them)

Working at home can be a dream or a nightmare, depending on the job, your preferences, and the disposition of your colleagues. It's pretty easy to find guidelines to making a telecommuting situation a success: you know you need to keep your boss in the loop, for example, and make sure your co-workers can see that you're really working. But, what about those pitfalls that arise only once you're comfortably ensconced in your brand-new home office? Here's what you can expect.

Americans Are Working at Home More Than They Used To

Last year, on days when they worked, 23 percent of employed Americans worked at least part of the day at home, according to the American Time Use Survey, which was released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics earlier this week. That's up from 2003, the first year in which figures were recorded, when 19 percent of employed U.S. workers spent at least part of their working days doing their jobs from home.

Use the Polar Vortex to Convince the Boss to Let You Work at Home

It's cold today in many parts of the country, really cold -- from 4 degrees early this morning in Nashville to a whopping negative 32 degrees in Fargo, North Dakota. If you live in one of these super-chilly areas, and have a job that relies on an internet connection, you probably have the option to work from home today. Before you while away the day, half-working while watching Netflix and drinking cocoa, consider this: the Polar Vortex might have given you your best chance at setting up a permanent work-from-home arrangement.

3 Tips to Help You Fake Working From Home

At least 20 million Americans work from home once a week or more, and during the holiday season, anyone with WAH privileges will be using them, whether it's to make up for the lack of vacation days or to multitask holiday prep while getting stuff done. But what what about folks who want to say that they're working at home -- but be lazy instead?

3 Practical Tips for Working Moms, From the Quora Question of the Week

Going back to work after having a child is a difficult decision to make, especially when it entails leaving your children at home to be cared for by someone else. In a perfect world, everyone would work together to prepare meals, clean the house, and stay on schedule, and working women would find that blissful work-life balance. For most, though, this isn't the reality. Regardless of whether you work inside or outside the home, being a working mother is difficult. It's inevitable that priorities, finances, and sleep schedules will shift when we juggle work and children. We turned to the Quora community to see what practical tips its members have to share with other working moms.

Part Time Jobs for Stay-at-Home Parents

Raising kids is no easy task, especially when trying to stretch a single paycheck from week to week. When one parent has decided to stay at home with the family, a part time job can help to provide some much needed financial support. The good news is that there are many part time career options that give stay at home parents the power to earn and create a balanced family life.

Mommy Conventions: Business Trips or Paid Vacations?

Everyone wants to work from home these days, and jobs and companies which allow telecommuting can be few and far between. Working mothers often find the greatest work-life balance when they are allowed to work from home. The fantasy that many people imagine is that of a person who is allowed the luxury of sitting in their pajamas and slippers in front of a laptop, while sipping lattes. All the while, the rest of us have to drag our begrudging behinds into an office to hang out in a cubicle.

7 Unusual and Valid At-Home Jobs

Time was, you had to be a graphic designer, a consultant or a freelance copywriter if you wanted to ditch your cubicle and make money in your pajamas. But jobs using your computer from home have brought virtual jobs at …