How Workers’ Compensation Works

Every year, millions of workers in the United States are injured while on the job. They might get sick from being exposed to certain elements in the workplace, or they might break a bone when operating a machine. Employers purchase …

4 Legal Decisions That Fell on the Side of Workers in 2015

Some of the legal decisions that were made in 2015 didn't do much to help workers. For example, Wisconsin was added to the list of Right-to-Work states this year. Many feel that these laws, which change how unions collect fees from the workers they represent, hurt unions and the middle class. In other disappointing news, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Integrity Staffing Solutions vs. Busk case, mandating that companies are not required to compensate workers for the time they spend in security-screening at the end of their shifts – or for any task that's not an "integral and indispensable" part of their job, for that matter. But thankfully, the legal news for workers wasn't all bad this past year. So, let's focus on the good, shall we?

5 Reasons Employees Get Denied for Workers’ Compensation

Millions of Americans across the nation spend their days working in risky environments. Many workers push their physical limits every day, lifting, pushing, pulling, crouching, and crawling. Some are exposed to dangerous fumes, sharp objects, extreme heights, and harsh elements. Even in seemingly safe environments, employees can still be at risk of getting hurt. Even worse is that employees can put themselves at risk of not receiving appropriate compensation for their work-related injuries or illnesses.