These 3 New Initiatives Aim to Help Working Moms Return to the Workforce

Wouldn't it be nice if it weren't nearly impossible to have a thriving, successful career and a happy little family simultaneously? Unfortunately in today's world, that dream seems to be a distant and unattainable reality, considering how difficult it is for mothers to find work after taking time off to care for their little ones in those precious first years. Thankfully, things are slowly changing and more mother-friendly career opportunities are popping up. Here are three initiatives that are making a huge impact for working mothers across the nation.

When Being a Working Mom Is the Pits, Here’s What You Need to Remember

Working mothers do indeed have it all – if by "having it all," you mean having both sides of a double-edged sword. Women are still fighting for equal opportunity and equitable pay, so when you pile on the added pressure of balancing a career and family, there's enough guilt there to drive anyone mad … and sad. If you choose (or "choose") to return to work after having a baby, you're going to have to accept that your decision will have its ups and its downs. Here's what you need to know to get through those times when you start to doubt whether you're cut out to be a working mom.

America’s Corporate Culture Is Too Stuck In Its Ways to Allow Paid Family Leave to Work

The U.S. is one of the few countries in the world that doesn't mandate any kind of paid family leave, and only 12 percent of private-sector employees in this country have access to it. This is despite the increasing number of elite employers who offer generous perks designed to improve work-life balance. What will it take for paid family leave to truly gain traction in the U.S.? Beyond a law requiring it, we'd need nothing less than a complete cultural shift. Even if paid leave were to be granted tomorrow to every employee nationwide, there's one problem that would still remain: an unsupportive corporate culture that makes it hard to take time away from work to take care of family.

Depressed or Anxious? Blame the Gender Pay Gap

Women are 70 percent more likely to suffer from depression than men, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and 83 percent of employed Americans consider this factor to be the number one barrier to workplace success, reports Diversity Woman. Discussions about why women are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety often focus on hormonal fluctuations or coping strategies. Now, new research suggests that part of the problem may actually be financial in nature.

One Company Offers a Work-Life Balance Solution for Moms: Part-Time Jobs

Being a working mother in America is no easy feat. Not only are there extremely limited or no paid leave options for a vast majority of working parents, but the high cost of childcare and long American workday force many women to leave their careers behind to care for their children. One company is trying to change that for working mothers. How? By giving moms the opportunity to work part-time.

Chore Wars: Why Are Women Still Doing All the Housework?

A recent Working Mother survey found that today's household responsibilities (a.k.a. chores) have not changed much since the 1950s, which wouldn't be such an alarming finding if women didn't make up nearly half of the American workforce. We'll take a look at how the responsibility of keeping a house and home, like Mom and Grandma did, puts a damper on women's careers and causes friction in their personal lives, as well. Listen up, lads … this one's for you, too. (Hint, hint.)

Make Your Career Dreams a Reality; These 5 Famous Moms Did

Working Mother magazine recently published an article that highlighted the inspiring stories of 25 celebrity mothers who chose to reinvent themselves mid-career to pursue new endeavors, which proved to be just as inspiring as they are prosperous. Read on to see how reinvention isn’t just for the rich and famous, it can also be your reality, too.