General Manager, Restaurant Advice

Q: What do you wish you knew about your job when you first started out?

General Manager, Restaurant in Liberty:
"Recognize When You Feel Mismatch Career."
When I was in my late 20s and working at my second job while raising family of five, I realized few months later that it was not the right place for me. But when I was offered a great opportunity to move from Missouri to Connecticut for another opportunity that I was excited about, I decided to stay at my former job because I thought, leaving would break my family. Life is too short, so my advice to young ones today. If a job really is not working out, find something new and change. Sometimes, random experiences make life exciting, and at the sametime will create or lead to new opportunities.

General Manager, Restaurant in Lawrence:
"Be The Example."
Restaurants are fast and sometimes harsh environments. The best way to get people to do what they should is to do it yourself as well. Hold them to your own standard. No one should demand something from someone they are incapable of doing themselves.

General Manager, Restaurant in Studio City:
"Know Who You Are And What You Are Worth."
Make sure you are paid according to the work you do and how well you accommodate the needs of staff guest and needs of the store. Know your worth.

General Manager, Restaurant in Studio City:
Know who you are and what you are worth. Work for someone who appreciates you and will bend over backwards for you as you do for them.

General Manager, Restaurant in Indianapolis:
"Consistency Is Key."
Systems are the key to success. Remember most of the time things are never as good as you think they are, but at the same time they usually are never as bad either!

General Manager, Restaurant in Flagstaff:
"Love 5 he job."
Ask for enough money.....stay focused.

General Manager, Restaurant in Atlanta:
"Always Do the Very Best Everyday."
Sometimes, in the real world it does take time to find the right place to work. There is something out there for everyone. It took me over 20 years to find my place and niche - I call it my second home and I find it extremely rewarding. I learned something from everywhere I worked and I took what a learned to the next place. This transfer of information and skills lead me to be the best employee in each position; it also create a situation that each place I worked wanted me to stay and keep my job with them.