Paralegal Advice

Q: What do you wish you knew about your job when you first started out?

Paralegal in Tampa:
"Pick A Field/Degree With A Specialty."
That's where the money is at and it is not as competitive. For instance, dental hygiene or engineering.

Paralegal in Bellingham:
"Path To Tribal Law."
Working for an Indian Tribe as a paralegal is a very rewarding experience. I do mostly long term civil litigation cases, but do handle other smaller issues such as real estate transactions, water law cases and HR issues. I came into this position having a broad background in family, corporate, governmental, bankruptcy and estate planning. When working for a Tribe, you find yourself relearning alot of what you know. Tribes are sovereign governments, not controlled by state law. A good foundation in federal law is helpful, but you must learn the Tribe Codes and traditions as well. Becoming a Tribal Spokesperson usually requires studying for and taking a Tribal Bar Exam (depending on the Tribe). I am a member of both the Nooksack and Lummi Tribal Bars. As a Spokesperson, I am able to represent the Tribe or Tribal Members in Tribal Court. My practice in Tribal Court has spanned Domestic Violence and Family Law to representing Tribal Departments such as Housing in Tribal Court.

Paralegal in Washington:
"Range Of Salary; Asked For Less Than The Minimum."
Obtain and retain strong research and organizational skills.

Paralegal in Indianapolis:
"Highly Organized."
Determine priorities and manage time accordingly.

Paralegal in Atlanta:
"A Clearer Career Path."
Read legal publications that offer practical learning, network with paralegal professionals within a positive environment and obtain a paralegal mentor with real leadership skills and experience. Pursue continuing legal education course work and keep us with technology trends. Finally, learn best practices and share/apply them within your work environment.